National Security Research Division

The RAND National Security Research Division (NSRD) conducts research and analysis for the U.S. government, U.S. allies, and private foundations. The division operates the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC).

Commentary

  • Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen speaks during the National Day celebration in Taipei, Taiwan, October 10, 2021, photo by Ann Wang/Reuters

    Taiwan Would Be Better Off Alone

    Dec 23, 2021

    Relinquishing diplomatic partners could free Taiwan from an unwinnable competition with China and refocus attention on what really matters: reducing China's coercive power by strengthening relationships with powers that can truly help.

  • Jacqueline Burns, bottom right, with Ambassador Donald Booth, at an Internally Displaced Person camp in Darfur, Sudan, in 2016, over a map of Sudan, photo courtesy of Jacqueline Burns; images by oxygen and JeanUrsula/Getty Images; design by Chara Williams/RAND Corporation

    Helping People Affected by Conflict: Q&A with Jacqueline Burns

    Dec 22, 2021

    From the Air Force to Africa to RAND, Jacqueline Burns resolved to help people whose lives have been torn apart by conflict or disaster. As a senior policy analyst she wants to be a part of finding better solutions to the complex questions of peace and security.

View all commentary

Latest Publications

  • A person looks at a COVID-19 news update on their cell phone, photo by svetikd/Getty Images

    Tracking News Manipulation by Malicious State Actors

    Nov 15, 2021

    During the pandemic, both Russia and China used authoritarian power over the media to manipulate the news. What can be done to better detect such propaganda campaigns—and guard against them in the future?

  • The Baltic Way demonstration on the Riga-Bauska highway, near Kekava, Latvia, August 23, 1989, photo by Uldis Pinka/CC-BY-SA

    Civilian Resilience in the Baltic States

    Nov 1, 2021

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania have a history of resistance to foreign occupation. If the countries were occupied today, civilians could play a powerful role in their defense. They could impose costs on the occupier, deny consolidation, reduce capacity for repression, secure allied support, and expand popular support.

View all publications

Get updates on RAND's work on National Security and Terrorism